Harney County’s Water Future: MESA and LESA Irrigation Systems

Uncertainties about water sustainability in Harney County are causing some ranchers to examine more efficient ways to irrigate alfalfa and hay crops.

Mark Owens went further. Mark is a hay farmer in Crane and one of the county’s three elected commissioners. In 2015, Mark attended a workshop on low elevation spray application (LESA) systems. Half-way through the presentation, Mark got on his cell phone and canceled an order for nozzles that would be used in his mid-elevation spray application (MESA) systems, the standard sprinkler system used in Harney County.

In March 2016, Owens converted 6 pivots to LESA. “It made total sense to me,” he said. “The savings in water and energy the first year were almost 25%. Using LESA, I was achieving almost 92% efficiency against the 75-80% efficiencies of MESA—with no reduction in yield.” For sure, both systems are better than water sprayed from wheel lines, which have about 65% efficiency.

Today, there are 42 more LESA systems in Harney County (48 counting Mark’s).

On May 17, 2017, Mark made a presentation to county ranchers at the ESD facility in Burns, where he compared new and old systems. People then drove out people out to Mark’s ranch for a demo.

LESA systems spray water from nozzles placed 12 inches above the ground or lower and spaced about 5 feet apart. As crops grow, the nozzles become less and less visible because they are under the canopy, further reducing water drift and evaporative loss, percolating water into the ground faster and saturating root zones more effectively. LESA works best on level fields.

LESA systems

LESA web image.jpg

Here is Mark’s comparison of MESA and LESA systems. The average water right allocation in Harney County is 3 acre-feet or 325,850 gallons per acre foot or 966,550 gallons per 3 acre-feet. This is typically the amount producers will utilize for optimal growth using MESA systems.

MESA                                                                        LESA

7.5 gallons per minute per acre                        5,8-6 gallons per minute

450 gallons per hour per acre                            348 gallons per hour per acre

10,800 gallons per day per acre foot                 8,352 gallons per day per acre foot

30 days to apply 325, 850 gallons                      39 days to apply 325,850 gallons

90 days uses 3 acre feet (97,200 gal)                90 days uses 2.3 acre foot (752,690 gal)

During his presentation, Mark made clear that reaching the high efficiencies of LESA systems depended on designing them to meet crop needs according to the type of soil and climate conditions. “Most importantly, you have to manage the system,” he said. “You have to go out and look at the fields. You can’t manage them from a pickup. It’s easy to over water.” LESA was so efficient, Mark had to shut down the system for five days last summer. “An efficiently designed system can be managed inefficiently,” Mark added.

Other Savings

LESA systems require less operating pressures. Mark reduced his horsepower requirements with a new pump design by eight horsepower, which saved approximately $10 a day in power costs.

If you have further questions about MESA and LESA, please contact Mark Owens.

Mark Owens

Harney County Commissioner

Cell:      541-589-2379

Office: 541-573-6356

mark.owens@co.harney.or.us

Retrofitting MESA to LESA

Harney County irrigation dealers are knowledgeable about conversions and costs. Basically conversion entails doubling the existing drops on the pivot lines, retrofitting them with double goosenecks and the correct types of sprinkler nozzles, and replacing regulators.

Cost and Financial Assistance

According to Mark, ‘If our results stay consistent during the second year, we will be able to recoup our out of pocket expenses within two years.

However, financial assistance is available for producers.

Harney Electric Cooperative customers can receive rebates on irrigation hardware upgrades and irrigation pumping improvements. Harney Electric has contracted with Harney Soil and Water Conservation District to deliver the program. Contact Bill Andersen, Energy Efficiency Analyst Harney SWCD, 541-573-5010, billhswcd@gmail.com

Oregon Trail Electric Cooperative OTCC) has a similar program, but funding is not currently in place. However, producers can fill out the paperwork and have it in place, when funding does become available. Oregon Trail Electric Cooperative 541-573-2666

The Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB) provides up to 75% of the cost of projects that conserve natural resources and improve watershed health. Individuals are eligible to apply, but are encouraged to work with organizations such as the Harney County Watershed Council or the Harney Soil and Water Conservation District. Contacts: Karen Moon, Harney County Watershed Council 541-573-8199; Karen.moon!oregonstate.edu; or Marty Suter-Goold, Harney SWCD, 541-573-5010; marty.suter@or.nacdnet.net

In addition, The National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)—formerly Soil Conservation Service—has other programs to help producers identify ways to conserve energy, programs to help organic farmers selling less than $5000 of organic products per year, as well as for improvements to irrigation efficiency. For information on these and other programs, contact Zola Ryan, District Conservationist NRCS Hines Field Office, 541-573-6446 ext. 107; zola.ryan@or.usda.gov

Attend the June 28 Meeting

The fourth meeting of one the Water Availability sub-group is set for June 28, 2-5 p.m. at the ESD Building, 25 Fairview Loop.

Short presentations include:

2: 15 p.m. Irrigation Technology: Computer Management for Pivots (Matt Nonnenmacher, Clearwater Pump & Irrigation)

3 p.m. Groundwater Rights and Use (Harmony Burright, OWRD)

3:30 Review Water cycle concepts; discussion of social, environmental and economic impacts of adopting different irrigation technologies and other conservation practices?

The meetings are open to the public. Those who have a stake and interest in our water issues are encouraged to attend.  Hope to see you there.

Other posts

Other articles about the future of Harney County’s water.

 

https://homesweetjeromedrapaport.wordpress.com/2017/05/01/the-future-of-harney-countys-water/

Well complaints)

https://homesweetjeromedrapaport.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/the-future-of-harney-county-water-well-complaints/

 

Note:  I am a member of the Harney County Watershed Council; these are my views and do not necessarily refect those of council members.

 

The Future of Harney County Water: Well Complaints

At meetings of the Groundwater Study Advisory Committee, Harney County Watershed Council, and the collaborative Community Based Planning sessions, domestic well and other users have been reporting drops in water levels. Both the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oregon Water Resources Deparment are conducting a formal groundwater study; OWRD is in charge of the observation wells for formal data. However,  some users whose wells are not part of the study, want to know how to report and register well complaints.

Reporting Decreases of Water

Fiie a “Well Complaint” about decreases in water levels with JR Johnson, Harney County Watermaster. Make an appointment to see her: 541-573-2591. She is extraordinarily busy; do not just ‘drop in.’

Bring your contact info (name/address, etc.) and whatever information you have about your wells (well location, any well logs—not necessary if you haven’t kept them—when you first started noticing the decreases, decreases over time, what steps you have taken to mitigate the problem and so on.

If there are decreases over time, try to provide specific information, such as the dates when you started noticing decreases and what you feel might be contributing to them.

The Watermaster will then log in to the official Oregon Water Ressources Departyment (OWRD) site and fill in the information you have given.

That information is not shared publicly. However, it does create a record over time for them and for you and is also part of any water decreases in observation and other wells that are part of the formal groundwater study.

Complaints can be made by holders of junior or senior water rights

Complaints about Water Quality

Information about contaminants that degrade water quality, (such as arsenic and salts) that are found in water wells, quantity and at what levels IS NOT a part of the groundwater study being conducted by USGS, Nor does the HC Watermaster or OWRD necessarily collect data about this.

The Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) does not have an official reporting form for the public to file complaints about well-to-well interference concerns about water quality or complaints about contamination in individual wells.

The procedure is for the complainant to contact the local Watermaster office, and the staff there will collect the necessary information from the complainant to make a preliminary determination about the situation. If the preliminary determination suggests that additional investigation is required, the Watermaster or their staff may visit the site to collect additional information.

The cities of Hines and Burns DO collect data about minerals, etc. in municipal wells and regularly share the info with their residents when they send out water bills.

Michael Campana, whose presentation about water flow in and out of the Basin was made to a meeting of the collaborative community planning process, included information about an arsenic study that was conducted for Lauren Smitherman’s thesis on his blog site: http://bit.ly/2nRfxSF

Community Based Planning: Well Decreases and Contamination

There has been some indication of desire to collect informal, anecdotal data from well permittees that have decreasing water levels or have some form of contamination in their wells. This is part of trying to figure out more about “what we don’t know” about water availability and water quality in the basin. This may or may not be the same information that is filed in “Well Complaints” with the OWRD by JR Johnson.

It may be that if enough data is gathered about contamination, a formal grant could be sought to quantify this.

Undue Interference: Senior and Junior Users 

OWRD is unable to limit the use of junior groundwater users to address interference with complaints from one or more specific senior users until it can establish that the senior user requesting relief has fully developed the groundwater resource.

Specifically, Division 8 rules provide the following definition of Substantial or Undue Interference: OAR 690-080(8) “Substantial or Undue Interference” means the spreading of the cone of depression of a well to intersect a surface water body or another well, or the reduction of the ground water gradient and flow as a result of pumping, which contributes to:

(a) A reduction in surface water availability to an extent that:

(A) One or more senior surface water appropriators are unable to use either their permitted or customary quantity of water, whichever is less; or

(B) An adopted minimum streamflow or instream water right with an effective date senior to the causative ground water appropriation(s) cannot be satisfied.

(b) The ground water level being drawn down to the economic level of the senior appropriator(s); or

(c) One or more of the senior ground water appropriators being unable to obtain either the permitted or the customary quantity of ground water, whichever is less, from a reasonably efficient well that fully penetrates the aquifer where the aquifer is relatively uniformly permeable. However, in aquifers where flow is predominantly through fractures, full penetration may not be required as a condition of substantial or undue interference.

Note:  I am a member of the Harney County Watershed Council; these are my views and do not necessarily refect those of council members.

The Future of Harney County’s Water

Harney County’s newest water challenge began in 2015, when the Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) said it would no longer process any new well permits for 5243 square miles of the Harney Basin (45% of the entire county).

According to statements from the OWRD, groundwater pumping “appears to be exceeding groundwater recharge.” The primary use of permitted groundwater wells is for irrigating alfalfa and hay fields.

The moratorium was followed by the designation of the entire county as being in an official drought by Governor Kate Brown. Hard to even imagine this today when heavy snow and rain has left large lakes of surface water and flooding rivers.

Up to OWRD’s announcement, it had business as usual in Harney County, where agriculture is an 89 million dollar plus industry—42% crops; 58% cattle, according to a 2012 agricultural census. Alfalfa and hay prices were sky high. Cow/calf ranches were flourishing. Pivots shot water into the air without much regard to efficiency or conservation. There were scattered reports of domestic wells drying up or, for those ‘digging’ deeper, arsenic, salts and nitrates showing up in their drinking water. There were reports of too many wild horses on too little land sucking on surface water that was diminishing. And so on.

OWRD Explains the Moratorium

More than 120 ranchers showed up at an open hose meeting sponsored by OWRD in May 2015 for an explanation of the moratorium.

OWRD’s presentation showed slides of the infill of irrigation pivots in the last fifty years, declining water tables, etc. and suggested that groundwater permits might have been over-allocated. According to OWRD the estimated current annual groundwater usage is 201,250 acre-feet, which exceeds the 170,800 acre-feet available for groundwater use. As a result, “groundwater levels are declining, as total discharge exceeds recharge, depleting the water that is being stored in the aquifer.” This is commonly referred to as water mining.

OWRD announced a 4- to 5-year groundwater study of the Harney Basin’s aquifer by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and said the permit moratorium would last until 2020, when the study would produce results. Presumably te study will include new recharge estimates, since the recharge number used by OWRD came from a 1972 study that assumed one inch of recharge over the entire basin.

http://www.oregon.gov/owrd/docs/Place/Malheur_Lake_Basin/2015_May_Groundwater_Open_House.pdf  (If this link does not open, cut and past the URL into your search engine.)

Groundwater Study Rules Advisory Committee (RAC)

The OWRD presentation was a big wake-up call. Their presentation had cast doubts that water storage in the aquifer beneath the basin might not last forever. The new fear: water would get used up much more quickly than was ever imagined. How much water was left? No one knew.

One response was the formation of a Groundwater Study Rules Advisory Committee appointed by The Harney County Court and OWRD to meet together to iron out questions.

A major point of discussion surrounded 39 applications for groundwater permits that were left in limbo, since OWRD said they would stop processing all permits even those that were in process currently. One result was the adoption of new options for those 39 applications and was a good example of the beneficial kind of collaboration between state and local officials.

Since the formation of RAC, at least four all-day committee meetings have occurred. Part of the meetings is given over to educational presentations about the study, scope, known geology and hydrogeology of the Harney Basin. Part of the meetings is given over to answering questions. For example, some ranchers say that there is more than one basin in the study area and asked that the study not take a ‘one suit fits all’ approach; others say that water in some areas of the basin seemed plentiful and showed no depletion and therefore should be exempt from the moratorium. Some ranchers expressed skepticism that water mining is occurring at all.

In July 2016, a presentation showed the purpose and scope of the groundwater study; spoke about the development of observation wells; delineated the boundaries of the Harney Basin; and showed analyses of water level trends in various areas of the basin.

https://www.oregon.gov/owrd/docs/Place/Malheur_Lake_Basin/GWSAC_Presentation_2016JUL27.pdf (If this link does not open, cut and past the URL into your search engine,)

A second meeting in October 2016 included as USGS power point overview for past completed studies in other basins and the timeline and approach for the Harney study.

https://www.oregon.gov/owrd/docs/Place/Malheur_Lake_Basin/GWSAC_Presentation_2016OCT20.pdf (If this link does not open, cut and past the URL into your search engine,)

The January meeting included a presentation of how water levels in groundwater wells are measured.
https://www.oregon.gov/owrd/docs/Place/Malheur_Lake_Basin/Citizen_GW_Level_Monitoring_presentation.pdf (If this link does not open, cut and past the URL into your search engine,)

A fourth meeting held in April 2017  An excellent presentation called “Groundwater Hydrology 101 was presented by geologist Michael E. Campana in the April meeting.began ” explained closed basin hydrogegology,  groundwater and surface flows and the factors that affect how water enters and leaves the basin.

http://bit.ly/2ph2FYw

These presentations have been useful for providing a basis for discussing issues of concern. To date, meetings have been cordial and helpful.

Harney County Watershed Council

Another response to the moratorium and drought was a new collaborative effort to plan strategies for the future of water quality and sustainability. The Harney County Watershed Council (HCWC ) put in for and received a community-based planning grant from the OWRD for a new collaborative effort. As with the Groundwater Rrules Advisory committee, some meetings included educational presentations to stimulate and focus discussion.

For the first nine months, the goals of the meetings of the Community Based Planning effort were (1) to develop an inclusive group of all affected users in the Harney Basin; (2) determine what information is not being gathered by the RAC and the USGS study (for example, potential water quality deterioration); and (3) identify some management strategies that might be effective in ensuring sustainability for people, wildlife and the environment.

For example, HCWC member Dustin Johnson conducted a February 6 workshop about how to achieve better irrigation efficiencies. Topics included deficit irrigation, low elevation sprinkler application, irrigation scheduling, a producer panel and agricultural water quality management. There was also a presentation on financial assistance programs presented by the Soil Water and Conservation District.

 

Future workshops may include information about alternative water-saving crops and other issues identified by the process.

The HCWC also put in for and received grants to measure water levels in over 150 observation wells, over and above those being measured by the USGS, to help broaden the data for the groundwater study.

Meetings of the Groundwater Study Advisory Committee, Harney County Watershed Council and Community Based Planning are open to the public. They are great ways for members of the community to ask questions and share points of view.

According to OWRD representative Harmony Burright, OWRD place-based water planning coordinator: “I want to encourage everyone to think about how we can manage water in a way that considers multiple interests, values our interconnectedness, and fosters collaboration. The stories we tell are powerful beyond measure. . . and encourage us to work with our neighbors to build communities that reflect our collective values.“

That’s a powerful and inspiring goal for Harney County people to work towards.

Note:  I am a member of the Harney County Watershed Council; these are my views and do not necessarily refect those of council members.

Seismic Shifts in the Music Business

The fifth edition of newly published The Musician’s Bsiness and Legal Guide addresses major changes in the industry during the last ten years. Here is editor Mark Halloran’s ‘Preface.” Every musician and music business professional should have this book. http://amzn.to/2nDYy7A  
Please share widely.
 
“We are proud to welcome you back to our updated and expanded book. This Fifth Edition embodies the most thorough and far-reaching changes in our history. Since our last edition a decade ago we have witnessed sea changes in the music business we could never have imagined. First, the size, power and profitability of the major record labels have all declined. Second, two new platforms for breaking artists, YouTube and American Idol-type TV vocal competition shows, have broken onto the scene. Third, we have seen the rise (and recent downward slide) of digital downloads (e.g., iTunes). Fourth, we have seen the rise of subscription radio services (Spotify and Pandora, for example), which feature “curated” (chosen) music which can satisfy virtually any tonal palette. Fifth, we have witnessed the rise of electronic dance music (EDM) and music festivals.
 
At the same time as this seismic shift, more music is being created and listened to than ever in the history of humankind. And there are opportunities to create and spread your music even if you are not signed to a label, or win The Voice. You fledgling indie artists out there should note the following phenomena that work in your favor:
1. You no longer need a recording studio with expensive gear and an audio engineer to make a great sounding recording.
2. You can record a video of you performing your song for virtually nothing.
3. Rather than relying on a big record company, you can raise funds on Kickstarter, RocketHub, and Indiegogo for your recordings, videos, and tours.
4. You can use social media (a website is a must) and your email list (required) to build and motivate your fanbase.
5. You can upload your videos and recordings for free on video websites such as YouTube, which has become the #1 search engine for music. It’s also the preferred listening platform for younger fans, who like that the videos are also easily shareable via social media.
 
This is essentially a new book given that all articles have been updated, and we have added seven completely new articles (please don’t throw away your old editions!): “YouTube Music,” “TV Talent Competitions: The Ghost of American Idol,” “Social Media Law for Musicians,” “Independent Record Labels and Record Deals,” “Recording and Distribution Contracts with Independent Labels,” “Producer Agreements are Stupid,” and “How 360 Deals Became Necessary and How To Negotiate Them.”
 
Even with all the changes in the music business as well as in this Fifth Edition, the basic lessons from the First Edition still apply, now more than ever. At some point in your professional music career, you will learn that there are legal questions implicit in almost everything you do. Whether you write, record, perform, or sell a song, your actions give rise to rights and obligations that you should consider. The best time to learn is now.
 
The most fundamental purpose of this book is to demystify the increasingly complex music business, and what many consider an indecipherable body of law that shapes it. And
to help you “make it” by explaining, as best we can, how the music industry and the laws that govern it work. To maximize
the utility of the book we have tried to make our information comprehensible to musicians and non-musicians alike, and have avoided presupposing a lot of knowledge on your part.
 
As useful as we trust this book is, we feel compelled to bring a few warnings to your attention. First, no one who has become
a music “star” has done so without obtaining competent help as they built their career—so should you. Talent agents, personal managers, lawyers, and business managers are all trained to guide you as you ascend your music career ladder. Naturally
their expertise costs money, but their cost is more palatable if
you consider that these expenses are not really costs but rather
an investment in your career. Next, the chapters are primarily designed to indentify legal issues and to give specific solutions that might be tailored to your specific situation. If you have a legal problem, do not rely on the information contained in this book; see an attorney. The chapters in this book that address legal issues are not the law, but merely describe legal applications, in general terms, for the music industry.
One final note—although this book is a useful tool, as a musician you should write music, not contracts. Unless you devote an appropriate amount of your time and energy to developing and exploiting your talent, this book doesn’t matter. Make it matter.
Mark Halloran, Esq.

The Musician’s Business and Legal Guide: NEW 5th Edition

Gateway to a Captivating, Inspiring, Treacherous and Dynamic Industry.

The Musician’s Business and Legal Guide, compiled and edited by Mark Halloran, Esq., has just been published by Routledge, Taylor, and Francis in a new 5thedition.

I spent the last year producing this new edition for Routledge, a large textbook publisher, and the Beverly Hills Bar Association Committee for the Arts. I also produced all editions that were published since 1991.

Like a record producer, a book producer provides a finished, ready-to-print copy to the publisher. I worked closely with Mark Halloran and other authors, cover and interior designer, editors and indexer and got formal permissions for an extensive quotes.

My goal since 1974, when I quit working for Bill Graham’s Fillmore Management, was to help muscians profit from their art. This book (and others that I wrote) helped accomplish it.

Featured in this Edition

If you are a musician and want to know how the music business works, so that you can profit from your business and protect yourself from adverse contracts and incompetent business people, this is the book to buy.

if you want to work in the music business, this book will help you make some decisions about where you might fit.

If you already work in the music business, this book gives you up-to-date legal information on streaming, social media law, TV talent show contracts, YouTube, independent labels, 360 recording deals, and protecting entertainment group names.

If you teach musicians about current industry practices, this book provide the indispensable information they need to know,

As in previous editions, the book features clause-by-clause contract analyses for 360 record deals, 50/50 recording deal options, music publishing, management, and producer agreements.

Chapters are written by fifteen prominent lawyers currently working in the industry.

Available from Amazon now. http://amzn.to/2nDYy7A

 

 

 

Goodbye to the Cuban Queen: A Lament for Ghost Town Ruins

Jerome, Arizona’s ruins are slowly disappearing. In March 2017, the roof of the Cuban Queen fell down, an iconic building that the Jerome Historical Society planned to restore.

The grand hulks that became symbols of the ghost town that it became known for—hospital, elementary school, Daisy Hotel and Douglas Mansion—have been restored and have become, respectively, the Grand Hotel, Town Hall, a private residence and State Historic Park.

Leigh and Richard weremarried here; kids loved to skateboard here; and the fire department benefits were great. Photo by Bob Swanson (Swansonimages.com)

Leigh and Richard were married in the Little Daisy; kids loved to skateboard theses floors; and the fire department benefits here were great. Photo by Bob Swanson (Swansonimages.com)

The floor of the Bartlett Hotel, the only ruin that remains on Main Street, is filled with coins pitched by tourists at an old outhouse and toilet and rusted mining artifacts. This odd coin toss earns as much as $6500 a year for the Jerome Historical Society.  Behind the shop now called Pucifer, the remains of the brick ‘cribs’, home of Jerome’s ladies of the night, were taken down by a previous owner to gain access to the back of the building.  The bricks were neatly stacked.  Then the bricks slowly disappeared.  As Jane Moore commented, it was a ‘crime.’

No cribs, no more. And where did all those bricks go?  (Photo by Bob Swanson)

No cribs, no more. And where did all those bricks go? (Photo by Bob Swanson)

The Jerome that I moved to in 1979 was still forlorn and decrepit looking, needing rescue. Today, Jerome has become modernized. Spiffed up. Gentrified.

This wreck was in old Mexican town below the post office. (Photo by Bob Swanson)

This wreck was in old Mexican town below the post office. (Photo by Bob Swanson)

Money flows in from tourist veins that are as rich as any gold mine. Over a million visitors a year come to shop, party in the bars, gawk at the views, and hear tales of bordellos, gunslingers, and ghosts. The shops are full of art, jewelry, and handmade clothing, award-winning wines and exotic olive oils.

Can this building be saved? It's the old Cuban Queen, symbol of the mining city bordellos. (Photo by )Bob Swanson

The Jerome Historical Society wanted to restore the old Cuban Queen, symbol of the mining city bordellos. Then the roof caed in. For those of us who lived in Jerome in the Jade/Rosie days, it was their home and magnet/tile making studio.  I still have some of them.  (Photo by Bob Swanson)

The names of many businesses play on the mythology of ghosts: The Haunted Hamburger, Ghost Town Inn, the Spirit Room bar, Ghost Town Tours, and Ghost Town Gear. The Grand Hotel provides ghosts meters to visitors interested in documenting their contacts. The annual Jerome Ghost Walk is one of the most popular events that the Jerome Historical Society produces. It draws many hundreds of people to its re-enactments of historic events.

Many don’t mourn the loss of ruins. Sometimes tourists fell off the old walls. Shopkeepers complained ruins were fire hazards and dubbed them liabilities. Many homes that once went for under a $1000 have sold for over a quarter of a million dollars. In the ghost town years, they were ripe for pickings and vandalism. Up to the 1980’s, residents would find people wandering through their yards, saying, “I thought this was a ghost town.”

The iconic T.F. Miller building was ordered to be torn down by Phelps Dodge in 1953. "Jerome is finished," a mine official said. Kids were paid a penny a piece to clean the bricks. (Photo courtesy: Jerome Historical Society)

The iconic T.F. Miller building was ordered to be torn down by Phelps Dodge in 1953. “Jerome is finished,” a mine official said. Kids were paid a penny a piece to clean the bricks. (Photo courtesy: Jerome Historical Society)

I never tired of walking among Jerome’s ruins. The shards of Jerome’s fabulous mining past were embedded in its abandoned buildings, crumbling walls, and collapsed roofs. Ruins shared visible histories of this once powerful and fabled city—“the richest copper mining city” in the West.  There were ghosts in those ruins; you could feel them.

The old bakery ovens are still hanging around in the back yard of one of my friends, (Photo by Bob Swanson)

The old bakery ovens are still hanging around in the back yard of one of my friends, (Photo by Bob Swanson)

Before new mine owners forbid walking down to the 500-level, I loved walking around the foundations of the housing units for mid-level employees (plumbers, carpenters, electricians). I loved sneaking into the old mining building known as the “Dry” with its rows of empty lockers and broken-up shower stalls. I could easily visualize 1500 miners simultaneously showering up after their shifts and hanging their clothes to dry on pulleys that hoisted them high into the rafters. Vaporous ghosts.

Interior of the Dry on the 500 level.  (Photo by Bob Swanson)

Interior of the Dry on the 500 level. (Photo by Bob Swanson)

For old-timers who return by the hundreds for the annual town reunion called “Spook Days,” ruins were the roots of their powerful attachment to Jerome. “I was only here from 1928-1948, but I feel a strong attachment to Jerome. No other place I’ve ever lived in have I felt that attachment,” said one old Mexican.

Another said, “I was only three years old when I left Jerome, but I remember things. . . I remember my father’s house. I remember the snow. And I remember sitting on my grandmother’s balcony at night, looking down into the valley. I could hear crickets and it was so peaceful.”

Ruins revealed oddities about people who used to live here. One of my favorite ruins was the old homestead where Father John used to live. When he died, he left behind a lot of junk: rusting cars, collections of stoves, and a room full of ladies shoes, singles only. Now what would a priest be doing with so many ladies’ shoes? Father John’s home mysteriously burned the night after he was found collapsed and dehydrated in his bedroom at the Catholic Church and was dragged to the hospital. Years later, the homestead was replaced with the new Gold King Mine, which includes a lot of old pre-fifties trucks, a museum of mining relics and old sawmill from Weed, California. There never was a mine there, much less one that mined gold.

A new town has emerged, full of its own colors and legends, a village of little crime and high spirits. The ghost town is all but gone.

One of my all time favorites ruins, now the cover of Rich Town Poor Town. It was in perfect splay when Bob took the shot. Then it fell down. (Photo by Bob Swanson)

One of my all time favorites ruins, now the cover of Rich Town Poor Town by Roberto Robago, a great book. The ruin was in perfect splay when Bob took the shot. Then it fell down. (Photo by Bob Swanson)

But when the oldtimers die, who will share the memories and secrets of old Jerome? And when the ruins are gone, where will the ghosts hide?

Updated from an earlier blog.

Walter Rapaport: Music, Audio and the Poetic

Guest post by Walter Rapaport, my husband of 42 years, continuing my posts about the old music business days of the seventies.

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Portrait of Walter at age 74 at home in Hines Oregon.  Photo by Laurie O’Connor.

“I’ve done some wrong things,

While livin’ my life

Made some wrong moves

You could criticize …”

(Barbara Mauritz, Lamb, A Sign of Change)

Sign of change was one of Lamb's finest album, a work of magical originality..

A Sign of Change, a work of magical originality, was Lamb’s first album, produced by David Rubinson for Fillmore Records.

For me, it’s about the emotional sum of words plus music.

Musicals were the start. Classical got to me with or without words. Great NYC DJ’s. Folk music drew me into the club scene in New York. Jazz came along and changed all the relationships in my mind. Then rock ‘n roll codified longings I did not voice until then:  Stones. Beatles, and acid pulled me westward!

I was 25 and a hi-fi nut.  Worked with Ampex tape recorders in language labs. By then I was a complete stoner, and the straight job was too restricting.  Enter Lamb! in San Francisco. My good friend Bob Swanson was a principal in that group and sent me tapes.  Needed a sound guy.  Called me on the night Nixon was elected and said they had a regular gig and would pay me a share. The Ribeltad Vorden bar paid the band $35 a week. Color me gone.

“When hardly a trace of love could I find.

Was a blind hearted woman.

Almost lost my mind.”

(Barbara Mauritz, Lamb, A Sign of Change)

Bill Douglas on bass, Bob Swanson on git., Barbara Mauritz sings, pianos. and gits. Walt finds a calling. And what a life.  No money, but poetry. I entered the universe of poetry and music. Live gig, rehearsal and eventually recording. Producer David Rubinson picked Lamb up for Fillmore Records and got Bill Graham, the godfather of rock ‘n roll, on board at Flllmore Managment. And Walter was still lost in the poetic.

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Singer Barbara Mauritz and guitarist of Lamb. Back cover of their second album, Cross Between. Co-producers: David Rubinson and Walter Rapaport.  Photo by Peter Olwyler.

“And I know, yes I know, praying for the light.

Down on my knees, alone in the night

Cryin’ Oh. look down here on me,

That I may see the way, yeah!”

(Barbara Mauritz, Lamb, A Sign of Change)

Lamb’s first album, A Sign of Change was pure jazz, with a dose of mysticism and another of gospel. I co-produced their second album, Cross Between. The gospel of studio recording was handed to me by the great engineer Fred Catero. 45 years later my mind distills the lessons, and when I am fortunate enough to record, I TRY TO FOLLOW THEM.

  • Be Positive!
  • Listen to each instrument and amp to find the sweet spot—put the mic. there!
  • Listen to the control room chatter and filter for meaning and direction.
  • Evaluate input for useful ideas.
  • When the talk gets to serious band business:  disappear—if not recording.
  • Be positive and, when required, be funny.

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    Recording engineer Fred Catero.

“And it’s in gettin’ down to earth

That we can recognize our worth

We were all put here together

For the worse or for the better

And I believe, and I say I believe

Until my dyin’ day

I just wanna say…yeah

We’re gonna have a party!”

(Barbara Mauritz, Lamb, A Sign of Change)

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Barbara Mauritz. Photo by Peter Olwyler.

Just before Lamb’s fourth album, the new producer fired me. Business reality caught up with me. The music went downhill from there. Ego? Not me!

Getting bumped off the poetic caused a hard landing. A lawyer’s letter informed me that I owed a share of partnership losses. I was depressed and out of money. My lawyer said I was responsible for my share. Oy vey!  Revelation: Wait, I ain’t got shit!  Call Bill Graham in the a.m. to laugh and suggest that I had about $2 and he was welcome to it, to which he replied, “It took you way too long to get it.” Thanks for the lesson, Bill!

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Joined a band called Bittersweet as sound guy, road manager. It did not “go.” Eventually got a job as a sound man at a nightclub called the “Orphanage.”  Good music by and large. A good time of life.  Reconnect with my love Diane, now 42 years married and counting. Have child, what a gas, often being parent at work, often with baby Max.

Became adept at multiple to 2-track mixes (house, stage, sound truck, and for Van Morrison a video feed). Founded White Noise Sound with Barret Bassick.  Did live sound and live broadcast, direct to 2-channel to air.  And this totally shaped my idea of how one recorded and produced sessions. Get the performance!  Go to it if necessary.  Walt and his A77 Revox got a surprising amount of work. NPR producer Tim Owens (“Jazz Alive”) kept us working. Found out I was not a good studio engineer.

Tim was promoted to Washington D.C.  Barret and I had a falling out.  I went to work as production mgr. at FRAP (Flat Response Audio Pickup), the most rewarding job I ever had.  I contracted for a year. Company looked like it might go…

Diane was done with the Bay Area. Took my van, my dog and my son to Jerome AZ. Suddenly I needed a complete life change. Returned to work after winter vacation, and found that FRAP product on the shipping table was still there, and knew that I didn’t want to go through the lack of cash that was sure to follow. Joined family in Jerome AZ and decided that house wiring is just a variation on balanced electronics wiring (it is!) and called myself a house wirer. Did whatever recording-live sound work that I could. Katie Lee and Major Lingo stand out. Still with the old A77!  Perhaps the most fulfilling tracks came from Katie in the form of a folk opera called Billy, Maude and Mr. D.

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Katie Lee’s folk opera. Available at http://www.katydoodit.com

She performed the first act flawlessly (23 min) and beautifully. Second act required one edit!  This was recorded using a Shure 58 mic for vocal, Shure 53 mic for guitar, both through transformers directly into A77 pre-amps.  (The CD is available thru Katydid Books and Music— http://katydoodit.com)

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Photo of Katie Lee by M.L. Lincoln. (Katydodit.com)

Friends like Katie taught us to enjoy hiking, camping and rafting. This  “getting down to earth“ stuff became a solid track of its own, and the poetry continued.

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Walter Rapaport and Richard Martin on the Colorado River in the eighties. For both, music and the life of the poetic guided their passions. Photo by Diane Rapaport